RODEO EVENTS

The Cochrane Lions Club Labour Day Rodeo is pleased to offer our fans over 16 exciting events to take in throughout our 3 day Rodeo including: 

 

  • Bareback

  • Saddle Bronc

  • Bull Riding

  • Junior Bull Riding

  • Roping

  • Steer Wrestling

  • Break-away Roping

  • Team Roping

 

  • Ladies Barrel Racing

  • Junior Barrel Racing

  • PeeWee Racing

  • Mutton Busting

 

  • Junior Steer Riding

  • Novice Horse Riding

  • Wild Pony Races

  • Wild Cow Race

Need to Register?

CLICK HERE

BACK for 2019! ... check out the  Mini Broncs  &  Mutton Busting

Learn more about some of these events, how they're scored and what's involved by reading below. 

 

Wild Cow Races

Complete and utter chaos. No better way to describe this class which gives anyone willing, the opportunity to try and wrestle down then ride a cow. I mean its a cow... how difficult can it be?

 

You will want to get your camera ready for this crowd favorite!

Wild Pony Races

Hold on to your hats – this fun event will get you caught up in the excitement. Teams of three youngsters ages 8 to 12 try to tame a wild pony long enough to get a rider aboard for a two jump ride. The team with the fastest time wins. These gritty competitors don’t give up easily – so get your cheering voice ready! And did we mention picture perfect? Cameras ready for this event because these little ponies are full of spit & vinegar.

Bull Riding

Definitely the most dangerous event in rodeo, bull riding requires a positive attitude as a cowboy engages in a test of nerves against the bull. A rope with a handhold braided in it is wrapped around the bull with a weighted cowbell hanging underneath, allowing the rope to fall free when the ride is complete. The rope is pulled snuggly around the bull's girth, and is kept tight only by the strength of the cowboy's grip.

 

During the ride, the cowboy tries to stay close up on the rope's handhold to prevent his arm from straightening and his hand from breaking loose. A bull rider is disqualified for touching the bull with his free hand or bucking off before the end of the eight-second ride. A rider is not required to move his feet because staying on these loose-hided animals is difficult enough. However, if a bull rider does spur, he will be marked higher.  

Bare Back

This is the most physically demanding rodeo event. Using one arm, the cowboy holds onto the rawhide handhold of a riggin (a leather pad cinched around the horse's girth). The handhold is snug-fitting and is customized to the individual's grip. The stress on the rider's arm is intense as the riding arm absorbs most of the horse's power.

 

A bareback rider will be disqualified for touching the animal or equipment with his free hand, or bucking off before the end of the eight-second ride.

The bareback rider tries to reach as far forward as he can with his feet, then rolls his spurs back up toward the riggin. At the same time, he must keep from being pulled away from the handhold. The higher and wilder the rider spurs, the higher the marks.

Roping

Barrel Racing

Tie-down roping is the most technical event in rodeo. It requires a unique partnership with a working horse and excellent hand eye coordination on the part of the cowboy. The calf is always given a head start and releases the barrier with a breakaway cord when it reaches the end of that head start. If the roper leaves the box too early, he breaks the barrier and will be assessed a ten second penalty. Once the calf is roped, the contestant relies on his horse to stop in a stride as he dismounts on the run to reach the animal, flank and tie three legs. While the roper makes the tie his horse works independently to keep the rope taught. Time is called when the roper throws his hands into the air signaling he is finished.

Saddlebronc

Rhythm is the key in this event. The rider moves his feet from the horse’s neck in a full arc toward the back of the saddle in time with the bronc’s action. The cowboy must ride in a saddle built to CPRA specifications with a braided rein connected to the horse’s halter. The cowboy uses this rein for balance. Where a cowboy holds onto the rein is very important. If he takes too short of rein, he will be pulled over the front, too long he may be bucked off the back.

 

The rider will be disqualified for touching any part of the horse or his equipment with his free hand, losing a stirrup or being bucked off before the end of the eight-second ride.  

 

Steer Wrestling

Timing, coordination and strength are prerequisites for a steer wrestler. The steer wrestler starts behind a barrier; a rope stretched across the front of the start box that is tripped by the steer crossing the line, giving it a head start. If the steer wrestler does not allow the steer a head start, a penalty of 10 seconds is added to his time. The steer wrestler's horse is trained to run nest to the steer so the steer wrestler can grab the steer's left horn, taking the right horn in the crook of his right elbow. As his feet hit the ground, with his legs extended forward, he slides the steer to a halt. (The steer must be on its feet before being thrown.) Using the momentum of the running steer, the steer is rolled to the ground. The steer must be flat on its side with all four legs extended on the same side before the official time is taken.

Barrel racing (Pee Wee, Junior & Ladies) is the only all female event at the Cochrane Rodeo. Combining strength, agility and sheer horsepower, this timed event is an all time favourite. As with tie-down roping, barrel racing requires close cooperation and teamwork between horse and rider.

 

In the barrel racing competition, contestants circle three barrels in a cloverleaf pattern. Time is marked with the use of an electronic eye timer. A rider may touch or even move a barrel. However, if she knocks over the barrel, a five-second penalty will be added to her total time.

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109 - 5th Avenue West,

Cochrane, Alberta  T4C 2K8

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